dslr

23Jan

PREVIEW 2 | Orlon Mix

PREVIEW 2 | Orlon Mix from nam phan on Vimeo.

Another trailer to the demo reel I have been working with Orlon which I creatively labeled it as “Preview 2”. (If you haven’t seen the World Premiere of “Preview 1”, check it out http://namphan.com/preview-orlon-mix/) Photographed on a cold and windy night somewhere around the University of South Florida. We actually stumbled upon this location after our regular spot at the Argos building was locked down with another large dance crew. Call it divine intervention or just call it just the best luck ever, the new location was a better fit.

Shot on a Canon 7d peering through a Canon EF-S 17-55 f/2.8 while gliding around on a Pico Dolly. Post production was done through Adobe After Effects CS6 and Sony Vegas Pro 12.

If there is no struggle, there is no progress. -Fredrick Douglass


Here’s the first in line of a new video segment that I’m putting out for all you photog and DIY geeks like myself. I’m calling it a pretty obvious and self explanatory name, Construct. All of the segments in the Construct series will consist of fairly straight forward weekend DIY’s, hacks and shortcuts. For this particular project, I’m showing off how to craft an ir Blaster. For those that don’t know, an ir Blaster basically acts as a wireless shutter release for your camera. This should work for a variety of camera manufacturers (i.e. Nikon, Canon, Sony, Pentax, Fuji). Check out the video with more details right after the break.



Here’s the shopping list you’ll need while rummaging through your garage and hitting up your local nerd synagogue-Radio Shack:

2 x infrared LEDs (950nm)
3.5mm headphone jack
Sandpaper
Crazy Glue
Soldering Iron

A couple of pointers when putting this homemade ir Blaster together:

  • For the 3.5mm headphone jack, you’re going to use just the positive terminals from the left and right channel. As for the negative terminal, you can just trim it off but make sure it does not come into contact with any of the positive terminals as it will render your ir Blaster useless.
  • According to the internet gods, the infrared LEDS would need to be wired in a reverse parallel fashion. I’ve never heard of reverse parallel but I’m not going to call up my 8th grade science teacher to try and confirm this so called reverse parallel shenanigan. So, for LED #1, the positive lead(+) should go to the left channel and the negative lead(-) should go to the right channel of the headphone jack. As for LED #2, the positive lead should go to the right channel and the negative lead(-) should go to the left channel.
  • If you want the LEDs to sit flush to each other, just stroke a little sand paper to make them fit all nice and cozy.

I haven’t had a chance to try the ir Blaster on a variety of phones but I’m currently rockin’ a Motorola Atrix 4g with Cyanogenmod which worked fine-most of you out there have a far better Android or iPhone so you should be fine. As for actual trigger performance and camera response, it worked really well. I hit my limit for the maximum distance I was able to trigger the camera from at around the 8 foot range. With that said, this isn’t the Holy Grail of wireless shutter release gadgets that’s going to allow you to go out and replace your Pocket Wizards with but for a mere $10 and an hour of your time, it can serve you very well if you’re in a pinch and if you don’t need the extended range.

Have any questions? Post it down below.